Academics

Our Program

Stevenson's mission of Success for Every Student shapes our educational program. We provide a wide array of courses that will best prepare students for life after high school, and help them accomplish the commitments outlined in the three pillars of a Portrait of a Stevenson Graduate. See our Course Book for details on our curriculum.

Graduation Requirements

Tutoring/Academic Support

ACADEMIC DIVISIONS
Applied Arts
Communication Arts
Fine Arts
Mathematics/Computer Science
Physical Welfare
Science
Social Studies
Special Education
World Languages/ELL

SCHOOL DAY SCHEDULE
The school day at Stevenson High School extends from 8:30 a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Students are expected to be in attendance during these hours. There are eight, 47-minute periods in each school day, including a mandatory lunch period. “Early bird” classes are also offered in physical education and certain Advanced Placement science classes. Alternate schedules are followed periodically throughout the school year to allow for various activities and meetings.

STUDENT COURSE LOAD
Every student must be enrolled in the following each semester:

■    At least five credits of coursework
■    A sixth supervised period (either an additional class or a full-period study hall)

Students must meet the State of Illinois requirement of 300 minutes of supervision each day. 

Course Book

Grading

Stevenson’s grading system measures student mastery of the essential standards and targets for a class, or how well the student understands the material in class. The final grade is a professional determination of the student’s body of work, with consideration of their growth.

Since Evidence Based Reporting models use proficiency scales (and not points) to collect accurate evidence of student performance and academic growth, students can reflect on and grow their knowledge and skills throughout the semester. At the end of the semester, the teacher reviews the evidence presented by each student, in each target, and converts said evidence into a traditional letter grade. In this model, student learning is not based on points nor weights, but what it should be—a professional interpretation of evidence. The goal of this approach is to provide the teacher, student, and parent as accurate a picture as possible of the student’s learning and to encourage a dialogue about how the student can master the material for the class. In particular, because learning is a process that takes place over time, each assessment will provide feedback for the student about what to focus on next, and the student will be allowed to reassess when those new assessments show a higher level of mastery, then those new scores replace the old ones. Please visit www.myebrexperience.com/how-to-read-the-grade-book for more details about how the final letter grade  is calculated and communicated.

AP

AP questions? Call Jennifer Lukas at 847-415-4200

AP Central Website


What is Advanced Placement?
Advanced Placement is a program of college-level courses and exams that gives high school students the opportunity to receive advanced placement or credit in college. The content of these college-level courses is determined by the College Board.

Why Take an AP Class?
AP examinations offer students the following benefits:
• The opportunity to sharpen academic skills, allowing them to enter college with the confidence that they can succeed.
• Exemption by the college or university from introductory courses and permission to take higher-level courses, enabling students to move ahead in areas of interest.
• An opportunity to demonstrate to colleges the ability to successfully pursue rigorous coursework.
• Academic credit that can give them a head start in college.
• Tuition savings – a year or more of credit may be granted for a sufficient number of qualifying AP grades.
• Time to explore undergraduate subject areas that they wouldn’t otherwise be able to study, and time to pursue internships or to study abroad.
• The opportunity and satisfaction of meeting a challenge.
• Eligibility for collegiate honors and other special programs open to students who have received AP recognition.

How Do AP Exams Work?
Every examination receives an overall grade on a five-point scale:

Extremely Well Qualified 5
Well Qualified 4
Qualified 3
Possibly Qualified 2
No Recommendation 1

2020 AP Exam Calendar

All dates and times set by the College Board

WEEK 1 - May 4-8, 2020

Monday, May 4

• U.S. Government and Politics (8 a.m.)
• Physics C: Mechanics (Noon)
• Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism (2 p.m.)

Tuesday, May 5
• Calculus AB (8 a.m.)
• Calculus BC (8 a.m.)
• Human Geography (Noon)
• German Language and Culture (Noon)

Wednesday, May 6
• English Literature and Composition (8 a.m.)
• European History (Noon)
• Physics 2 (Noon)

Thursday, May 7
• Chemistry (8 a.m.)
• Spanish Literature and Culture (8 a.m.)
• Physics 1 (Noon)
• Japanese Language and Culture (Noon)

Friday, May 8
• U.S History (8 a.m.)
• Art History (Noon)
• Computer Science A (Noon)

WEEK 2 - May 11-15, 2020

Monday, May 11
• Biology (8 a.m.)
• Chinese Language and Culture (Noon)
• Environmental Science (Noon)

Tuesday, May 12
• Spanish Language and Culture (8 a.m.)
• Latin (Noon)
• Psychology (Noon)

Wednesday, May 13
• English Language and Composition (8 a.m.)
• Microeconomics (Noon)
• Music Theory (Noon)

Thursday, May 14
• Comparative Government and Politics (8 a.m.)
• World History: Modern (8 a.m.)
• Macroeconomics (Noon)
• Italian Language and Culture (Noon)

Friday, May 15
• Computer Science Principles (8 a.m.)
• French Language and Culture (8 a.m.)
• Statistics (Noon)

Benchmark Exams

Benchmark exams are used to determine placement in English, mathematics and world languages courses for some incoming freshmen (including transfer students), and for some new students in grades 10-12.

Eighth-grade students from Consortium 125 schools in District 76, District 79, District 96, District 102 and District 103 will not take a formal placement test in English, math or science. Rather, students will receive placements or recommendations in those subjects based on common assessments and teacher feedback. World language students at the consortium schools will complete a benchmark examination at their school.

Students at Hawthorn District 73 and St. Mary Catholic School only need to take the math benchmark test at Stevenson. They will complete the world language placement test at their schools and do not need to take an English placement exam. English placements will be based on standardized test results and eighth-grade teacher recommendations.

Families must be registered as district residents through our Student Services Division before testing can take place. (To verify residency, please contact the Student Services Division at 847-415-4500.)

Remaining 2019 Exam Dates (details below)

• Friday, July 19, 2019
• Friday, July 26, 2019

Benchmark Exam Day Schedule

7:30 a.m.    Student arrival
8:00    Check-in for registered students
8:30-10:00    World Languages
10:15 -11:15    Mathematics
11:30-12:30    English


Location: The benchmark exams will be given in the West Building. Check-in will be in the Forum (Point) lobby, which is located off parking lot B. Students should arrive 20 minutes before their first test begins to confirm registration. Students staying for the mathematics and English benchmarks may wish to bring a snack/beverage to eat or drink between the two tests.

What to Bring: Students should bring several, sharpened No. 2 pencils and the calculator that they use in their current mathematics class, plus a snack and water bottle.

Bus service will not be provided.


Mathematics Benchmark Information
Placement in mathematics is determined by student performance on a 60-minute multiple-choice subject area exam. Here are the topics covered on the exams. Contact Anna Kotvis at akotvis@d125.org to register.


World Language Benchmark Information

All transfer students and sender school students interested in registering for a world language course, but who were absent during the placement exam administered in class earlier in the year at their sender school, will need to register for benchmark testing with the World Languages Division by contacting Sylvia Lima at slima@d125.org. Please contact your student’s sender school prior to registering for benchmark testing at Stevenson to verify your student didn’t already take the exam earlier in the year.

Students who have prior coursework or experience in Chinese, French, German, Hebrew or Latin, and are interested in potential placement in one of these language programs beyond the introductory level, may also sign up for the corresponding language benchmark exam.


English Benchmark Information/Registration
Students who can provide a standardized reading and/or English test score (from the MAP, AIMS or Iowa tests, for example) do not need additional assessment. They can simply have a current English Language Arts teacher send scores and a recommendation to Tim Foley in the Communication Arts Division at tfoley@d125.org.

If a student cannot provide a standardized reading and/or English test score, recommendations/placement in Freshman English and literacy courses will be determined by two reading tests of the student’s ability to comprehend and analyze text. Students should expect to read texts and answer questions in argumentative paragraphs.

To register for an English benchmark exam, contact Denise Perkins at dperkins@d125.org.

District 76, 79, 96, 102 or 103 Students

Eighth-grade students from Consortium 125 schools in District 76, District 79, District 96, District 102 and District 103 will not take a formal placement test in English, math or science. Rather, students will receive placements/recommendations in those subjects based on common assessments and teacher feedback. World language students at the consortium schools will complete a benchmark examination at their school.

Course placements/recommendations will be mailed home shortly after benchmark exams, in time for the Course Selection Evenings that will be held in late January. Parents and students should work with their eighth-grade teachers on any questions regarding course placements/recommendations. 

Stevenson faculty and eighth-grade teachers meet regularly to determine course goals and review prior results. Because of this close communication, eighth-grade teachers are aware of the content for Stevenson courses. Students do not need to look beyond their classroom teachers for help understanding course placements/recommendations.

Students interested in registering for a world language course, but who were absent when the benchmark exams were administered in class at their sender school, must register to take the exam by contacting Sylvia Lima in the World Languages Division at slima@d125.org. Please contact your student’s sender school prior to registering for benchmark testing at Stevenson to verify your student didn’t already take the exam earlier in the year.

District 73 Students

Students at Hawthorn District 73 only need to take the math benchmark test at Stevenson. They will complete the world language placement test at their schools and do not need to take an English placement exam. English placements will be based on standardized test results and eighth-grade teacher recommendations.

Course placements/recommendations will be mailed home shortly after benchmark exams, in time for the Course Selection Evenings that will be held in late January. Parents and students should work with their eighth-grade teachers on any questions regarding course placements/recommendations. 

Stevenson faculty and eighth-grade teachers meet regularly to determine course goals and review prior results. Because of this close communication, eighth-grade teachers are aware of the content for Stevenson courses. Students do not need to look beyond their classroom teachers for help understanding course placements/recommendations.

Students interested in registering for a world language course, but who were absent when the benchmark exams were administered in class at their sender school, must register to take the exam by contacting Sylvia Lima in the World Languages Division at slima@d125.org. Please contact your student’s sender school prior to registering for benchmark testing at Stevenson to verify your student didn’t already take the exam earlier in the year.

Non-Sender School Students

All incoming freshmen transfer students and other students from non-sender schools will take benchmark examinations on one of the dates listed above in mathematics, English, and if applicable, a world language to help determine their placement in coursework at Stevenson. There will not be a formal science exam, rather, placements/recommendations for science will be made based on common assessments and math placements/recommendations.

Students at St. Mary’s of Buffalo Grove will only need to take the math benchmark test at Stevenson. (They will complete the world language placement test at their schools and do not need to take an English placement exam. English placements will be based on standardized test results and eighth grade teacher recommendations.)

Students will not be able to register for classes nor receive placement information without taking a benchmark exam; therefore, we recommend testing as early as possible. Families must be registered as district residents through our Student Services Division before testing can take place. (To verify residency, please contact Student Services at 847-415-4500.)

SAT/PSAT

At Stevenson, students take the following SAT and PSAT exams:

• Junior year: PSAT in the fall semester and SAT in the spring semester.
• Sophomore year: PSAT 10 in the spring semester.
• Freshman year: PSAT 8/9 in the spring semester.

Details on each exam are listed below.

SAT - Juniors

All Illinois high school students must take the SAT in the spring of their junior year as part of state graduation requirements. The SAT exam is the state’s college and career readiness assessment. 

• Students will automatically be registered for this exam and there will not be any additional fees to take this exam. 

• Though this SAT is a required state test for juniors, the resulting scores are official SAT scores that can be reported to colleges during the application process, if you choose. 

• Scores will be available in students’ College Board accounts 6-8 weeks after the exam. A paper copy of scores will not be mailed or distributed. 

• Stevenson’s rigorous curriculum prepares students for the SAT. There is no need to practice in advance for the exam. For those who wish to practice, or get a feel for the test, see the free resources below.

The SAT exam tests knowledge in four areas:

• Reading - Multiple choice questions will assess students’ understanding of reading fiction and nonfiction passages.

• Writing and Language - Students will identify grammatical errors in written statements in multiple choice questions.

• Math - Students will demonstrate their knowledge of linear equations, problem solving, and the manipulation of complex equations through multiple choice and short answer questions.

• Essay - Students will read and then evaluate a passage using evidence from the passage to support their answer.

For general questions about the SAT and the college application process, students should contact their counselor. 

For specific questions about the exam administration or about accommodations, please email shs_testing@d125.org or call the Teaching and Learning Division at 847-415-4200.

For more information about the SAT, including sample questions and approved calculators, please read the SAT Student Guide.

Helpful SAT Resources

General Practice Information:
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/full-length-practice-tests

SAT Practice on Khan Academy:
https://www.khanacademy.org/sat

Daily Practice App:
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/daily-practice-app?excmpid=SM056-AL-1-tw

Downloadable Practice Tests:
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/full-length-practice-tests

Downloadable Practice Tests for Assistive Technology:
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/full-length-practice-test-assistive-technology

Downloadable MP3 Practice Tests:
https://www.collegeboard.org/students-with-disabilities/after-approval/taking-sat-accommodations

PSAT - Juniors

Checking Your PSAT Score

PSAT/NMSQT

Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test

All Stevenson High School juniors will have the opportunity to take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test free of charge at SHS. Sophomores who wish to take the exam will have to pay a fee.

What is the PSAT/NMSQT?
The PSAT/NMSQT is a multiple-choice assessment of verbal, mathematics, and writing skills. The test measures students’ critical thinking and reasoning skills, rather than focusing on recalling memorized, rote facts. The PSAT is an optional test that provides practice for the SAT Reasoning Test through personalized feedback of student performance with suggestions for improvement.

The SAT Reasoning Test, taken later in the junior year, can be used as a standardized test in college applications and may be helpful for students wanting to pursue admission to highly competitive colleges or universities.

The PSAT also serves as the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT). Top performing juniors nationally (approximately 1%) may be eligible for money through National Merit, National Achievement, or National Hispanic Scholarship funds.

Why take the PSAT/NMSQT?
Although the PSAT/NMSQT is an optional test, juniors should thoughtfully consider taking this test because:

  • It is free practice for the SAT Reasoning Test, which is now the state and federally mandated collegiate entrance exam.

  • The PSAT will provide free, personalized, focused practice through Khan Academy to assist with SAT preparation.

  • Top performing juniors may be eligible for merit scholarships.

PSAT 10 & PSAT 8/9 - Sophomores & Freshmen

The PSAT 10 and PSAT 8/9 exams are state-required, preliminary SAT tests for sophomores and freshmen, respectively. They are designed specifically for those grade levels to assess knowledge and skill levels. The PSAT exams serve as benchmarks that allow students and teachers to identify and target areas for practice for the state-required SAT exam during junior year. The tests emphasize reasoning and logic skills rather than rote memorization of facts and figures.

When and Where Will the Tests Be Taken?
The State of Illinois determines when PSAT exams will be administered, which is typically in late winter or early spring. Students will take the test at Stevenson. Testing locations will be announced. Students with testing accommodations will be contacted separately. No registration will be necessary, and there is no fee.

Additional Online Preparation and Resources
The following sites may prove helpful as your student goes through the PSAT process:

Approved Calculators: Click here for a list of approved calculators

More information about the full-fledged SAT: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat?excmpid=VT-00051

Your counselor is the best resource for any questions regarding your student’s participation in the PSAT and other collegiate exams. For questions regarding national testing at Stevenson, please email shs_testing @d125.org.


How to Access Your PSAT 10 or PSAT 8/9 Score

Scores are released by the College Board, and are available only through a College Board account. Students who set up an account will receive an email from the College Board with the access code needed to view scores.

If you have an existing College Board account, sign in here.

Students who do not have an account must create a College Board account.

Students who do not see their scores when logging in may need to enter an access code. Students who need help in obtaining their PSAT access code can email SHS_testing@d125.org or go to Room 7096 and see Ms. Lukas.

The video below, prepared by Stevenson’s College Career Center, gives helpful information on understanding PSAT scores. For additional information, read the College Board’s guide, Understanding Your Scores.

Checking Your PSAT Score

Final Exams

2019-20 First Semester Exam Schedule

First-semester exams will take place Wednesday through Friday, Dec. 18-20, 2019. Here is the exam schedule:

Time Wednesday, Dec. 18
8:30-10:00 Period 1 Exam
10:10-11:40 Period 2 Exam
11:50-1:20 Period 4 Exam
Bus Pick-up 1:35 p.m.
Time Thursday, Dec. 19
8:30-10:00 Period 3 Exam
10:10-11:40 Period 7 Exam
11:50-1:20 Period 5 Exam
Bus Pick-up 1:35 p.m.
Time Friday, Dec. 20
8:30-10:00 Period 8 Exam
10:10-11:40 Period 6 Exam
11:50-1:20 Make-Up Exam
Bus Pick-up
 
11:55 a.m.
(Late pick-up 1:35 p.m.)

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exam Week Notes

All school rules are in effect on exam days.

Because all passing periods are 10 minutes during exams, there will be no “traveler’s bell.” Students may not be in the academic hallways during exam periods without a signed pass from a teacher.

Rescheduling Exams
Students may reschedule exams if they have three in one day. To reschedule, a parent must call or email the teacher of the course for approval. The rescheduled exam must be completed within the three-day exam period.

Students seeking to take an exam prior to or after the three-day exam period must contact their counselor.

The Testing Center will be open from 7 a.m. until 3 p.m. on all three exam days.

Bus Service
Buses will bring students home after the last exam on Wednesday and Thursday, Dec. 18-19, and after the second and third exam periods on Friday, Dec. 20.

Driving/Parking On Campus
Students may not drive or park on campus during school hours on final exam days unless they have a valid parking permit for the proper marking period.

For juniors and seniors, there are a limited number of temporary, one-day parking permits available in Room 2400 for $3 per day. One-day permits must be purchase at least one day in advance. Sophomores are not allowed to park on campus, even during finals.

Cell Phone Usage
All regular cell phone rules are in effect during final exams. Cell phones and other electronic devices must be turned off and out of sight in classrooms, in academic hallways during exam periods, and in all other areas of the school previously identified to students during orientation. Please see your dean if you have questions.

ILC/QLC/ELC Hours
During unscheduled time, students may use the Information and Learning Center (ILC), the Quiet Learning Center (QLC) or the East Learning Center (ELC) for independent, quiet study. Students are expected to remain in the ELC for the entire exam period. Students may leave the ILC or QLC for common areas.

Open Gym
The Fitness Centers in the East and West buildings and the Sports Center will be open for all students during final exam periods only. The Field House will be closed before school, after school, and during exam periods.

Honor Rolls

Honor Rolls

Questions? Call 847-415-4525

At the end of each semester Stevenson announces its Honor Rolls. All letter grades are considered for Honor Roll. This includes courses that are not calculated into the grade point average. The standards for this achievement are calculated based on weighted or unweighted grade points and are as follows:

Gold Honor Roll

  • grade point average of 4.0 or higher with no grade lower than a B
  • all A's regardless of grade point average

Green Honor Roll

  • grade point average of 3.0 with no more than one grade of C
  • all A's and B's regardless of grade point average

Any incomplete grade, even in a non-GPA class, will keep a student off the Honor Roll.

National Honor Society
The four pillars of National Honor Society are: leadership, character, service and scholarship. Sophomores and juniors with a cumulative 3.900 weighted grade point average are reviewed for membership in National Honor Society by a faculty council selected by the principal. The faculty council reviews leadership, service and character for the selection process as per the National Association of Secondary School Principals' Constitution.

Honor Graduates
Students who have earned at least 42 credits at the end of seven semesters and who have a weighted cumulative grade point average listed below are eligible to be declared Honor Graduates:

4.0 and above Highest Honors
3.75 - 3.99 High Honors
3.50 - 3.74 Honors

Honor Rolls By Year